Tag Archives: society

My brother knows me, and I like it

A collage I put together for a presentation I was giving on my life’s transitions.

My birthday has come and gone this year, but I just came across this post on Facebook that my little brother (I have three older brothers – all just as amazing) posted as a tribute to me on my 54th in March.

I want to cherish this writing, so have chosen to publish it here. It’s not everyday we can hear a loved ones speak about you. Often that is reserved for our funeral.  I particularly like to do similar on family birthdays, to let people know how we feel about them, and to let them know that we are aware and understand the strides they are making or are attempting to make in life.

Nollind wrote, “My sister Robbin Whachell turns 54 today. While conventional minds might say she is entering the latter part of an already full life (and maybe needs to slow down a bit), it’s evident to me that she is just getting started with a whole new life in a whole new world unfolding before her.

In a simple word, Robbin is a pioneer, just like her parents before her. Perhaps unbeknownst to many, she has been peripherally settling and cultivating a new home in the wilds of a new world for many years, while sustaining herself and her family at the same time within the conventional old world. As such, she is a living bridge between what has been and what will be, giving others a wonderful glimpse at the future emerging in our present today.

Seeking more personal meaning beyond the limited identity and confines of the traditional work world, Robbin branched out within her social life, enabling her to spread her wings and achieve a heightened vision to help the communities that she cared about the most. While some might say this was time wasted due to a lack of monetary compensation, she saw and felt something greater within it, something priceless that stretched far beyond economic value to a deeper, social value.

While I’m sure Robbin herself still feels like she has many miles to go on her transformational journey, it is without a doubt that each day her purpose is becoming stronger with clarity. Yes, the wilds of this new world are a chaotic, confusing, and uncertain place but each day her purpose, as her internal compass, helps her slowly map this new world and her new identity, giving them both a deeper sense of meaning and empowerment to her life.

In closing, I just want to refer to a couple of quotes by Marina Gorbis from her book The Nature of the Future. These quotes epitomize what Robbin is becoming and already is. She is a pioneer, a leader, living and leading by example. She is an advocate of a better world by building and living a better world out of her own life. She is a teacher, showing others the time and patience required to weave a better, integrated life whose social fabric can contain the complexities and uncertainties of the future to come.

Happy Birthday Robbin!

“In the past we’ve been advised to leave the personal and social at the door when we go to work. But the new work is all about the social and personal. It draws on the power of personal connections and the diversity of personal tastes, talents, and quirks.”

“What the pioneers of socialstructing are doing looks less like management and more like community organizing. Yes, good old-fashioned community organizing, but with a new set of tools and motivations. And their efforts are more akin to social movements than to managed organizations. Much of the motivation for building and contributing to socialstructs comes from a sense of urgency and greater purpose. This drive has often grown out of a particular vulnerability or personal experience of founders, making them into powerful advocates for their causes.”

— Marina Gorbis, The Nature of the Future

A collage I put together for a presentation I was giving on my life’s transitions.

Chum arrive on time for Coquitlam’s 2014 Salmon Come Home event

Chum salmon were swimming along Hoy Creek, likely helped by the heavy rains days prior to this year’s Salmon Come Home event hosted by the Hoy Scott Watershed Society and the City of Coquitlam on October 19, 2014. It was a welcomed relief to the organizers and a pleasant surprise for the public, as at last year’s event, the fish no-showed.

Every fall, rain or shine the Salmon Come Home event delivers an environmentally-themed free family fun day for the local community.   It allows the public  to tour the hatchery facility and learn about the activities of the volunteers of the Society.

There were all types of local exhibitors with crafts and activities; community group displays; ‘learn to fish’ information with Freshwater Fisheries Society BC; salmon presentations; tree planting; music by children’s entertainer, Chris Hamilton; a prize fishing pond by Kintec; food concession, face painting; photos with the salmon mascots; and a vibrant costume parade (kids and parents) with storyteller Angela Brown.

Children's entertainer, Chris Hamilton gets the crowd going at Salmon Come Home, an annual favourite event in Coquitlam.
Children’s entertainer, Chris Hamilton gets the crowd going at Salmon Come Home, an annual favourite event in Coquitlam. (Photo: Desmon Tansuma)
A salmon dissection demonstration at Salmon Come Home, Coquitlam   (Photo: Desmon Des)
A salmon dissection demonstration at Salmon Come Home, Coquitlam (Photo: Desmon Tansuma)
There were all types of local exhibitors with crafts and activities; community group displays, and more! (Photo: Desmon Des)
There were all types of local exhibitors with crafts and activities; community group displays, and more! (Photo: Desmon Tansuma)
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Angela Brown told stories and played dress up with her nylon circus to the delight of youngsters and parents at Salmon Come Home on October 19th. (Photo: Desmon Tansuma)

If you missed it,  prime viewing times to see the salmon are still underway as they return to the watershed from the middle of October through until early November. There are some great viewing points  in the Hoy Creek Linear park, (follow the path between 2975 & 2980 Princess Crescent) across from the City Centre Aquatic Complex which is located at the corner of Pinetree and Guildford Way, or simply Google search “Hoy Creek Hatchery” for location.  See more photos.

For further information please call 604-927-3583 or visit the Hoy / Scott Creek Watershed Society Facebook page.  Stay tuned for the  Hoy Scott Watershed Society’s “Salmon Leave Home” event which happens in spring!

Below is a great underwater peek of chum at Hoy Creek taken October 18th, 2014 by Desmon Tansuma.