Tag Archives: indigenous

BC Indigenous Leaders Win National Literary Award for “Unsettling Canada”

unsettling-Canada-Wins
Co-Authors: Arthur Manuel (left) and Grand Chief Ronald Derrickson (right)

News Release: Two prominent BC Indigenous leaders, Grand Chief Ronald Derrickson and Arthur Manuel, have won the Canadian History Association Aboriginal Book Award for their co-authored work Unsettling Canada; A National Wake-up Call.

The award was announced at the Canadian History Association organization’s annual gala in Calgary on May 31. The jury said it was “impressed by how the work traced the struggles for Indigenous rights and land claims in Canada during a time-period that frankly scholars (especially historians) have neglected, and from such a personal and significantly Indigenous-insider perspective. It was fascinating to read.“

Unsettling Canada, which tells the story of the past 50 years of struggle for Indigenous rights, also lays out a course for the future relations between Indigenous peoples and other Canadians. The book had already been named one of the top 100 political books by The Hills Times and one of the top six non-fiction books by Canadian Dimension Magazine and it has been widely praised.

Naomi Klein described Unsettling Canada  as “wise, enlightening and tremendously readable” providing “the back story of both grassroots and backroom struggles that created the context in which we find ourselves today, one in which a new generation of First Nations leaders is demanding sovereignty and self-determination, and more and more non-Indigenous Canadians finally understand that huge swaths of this country we call Canada is not ours—or our government’s—to sell.”

The award-winning Indigenous writer, Leanne Betasamosake Simpson described Unsettling Canada as “a breathtakingly beautiful story of Indigenous resistance, strength, and movement building, a critical conversation that Canada and Indigenous peoples must have because it is centred on land, and, therefore, it is one of the most important books on Indigenous politics I’ve ever read.”

Arthur Manuel said he is “very encouraged by the degree that non-Indigenous peoples are recognizing that we need to have a fundamental change in this country and this award is another indication of that.“

Grand Chief Derrickson said that although they had not written the book for an academic audience, he was very pleased to see that it worked on that level. “This book has been reaching Indigenous peoples and Canadians from many backgrounds because it looks at not only where we are today but it offers a look ahead at where we can be in the future.“

Arthur Manuel and Grand Chief Derrickson are now working on a follow up book that sets out in more precise terms how Canada and Indigenous peoples can honourable resolve the conflicts described in Unsettling Canada, and also points out the dangers to both sides if they fail to find just solutions to the Aboriginal title and rights issues.

Pan Am Games follows First Nations protocol

AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde, Regional Chief Day & other leadership at Three Fires Ceremony Pan Am Games  (Twitter Photo)
AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde, Regional Chief Day & other leadership at Three Fires Ceremony Pan Am Games (Twitter Photo)

“When visiting indigenous territory that isn’t your own, the protocol is to acknowledge whose territory you are on and thank them for allowing you there. If done properly, they welcome you in return,” explained an CBC News article on the opening of the 2015 Pan Am Games in Toronto, Canada this week.

This year’s torch relay was received by Chief LaForme of Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation at Harbourfront Centre in Toronto.

Using sacred tradition the Mississaugas of the New Credit held a Three Fires Ceremony on three sites that day to start the 2015 Pan Am and Parapan Am Games, marking the fact that the 16 sites of the games are in its traditional lands that extend south to Long Point on Lake Erie, east to the Niagara River and River Rouge and west to the River Thames.

The three fire locations are: The Toronto Islands, the modern Mississaugas of the New Credit territory and Fort York.

The fires being symbolic of the Mississaugas traditional and political alliance with the Ojibway, Odawa and Pottawatomi Nations, they will be kept burning until the end of the Pan Am Games.

July 10: This year’s torch relay was received by Chief LaForme of Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation at Harbourfront Centre in Toronto. (Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation )
July 10: This year’s torch relay was received by Chief LaForme of Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation at Harbourfront Centre in Toronto. (Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation )

The UN Confirms It: Canada’s Relationship With First Nations Is Broken | Hon. Carolyn Bennett

Monday, James Anaya, the UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, issued his highly anticipated report on “The situation of indigenous peoples in Canada.” Professor Anaya has reported a broken relationship between the federal government and Indigenous peoples, which is mired in distrust. He highlighted a serious and persistent crisis in outcomes for Indigenous people in this country, and the fact that the steps taken by the Conservative government to date have failed to address this crisis.

More at: The UN Confirms It: Canada’s Relationship With First Nations Is Broken | Hon. Carolyn Bennett.

Aboriginals in Toronto Dying at Average Age of 37: Report

Aboriginals in Toronto Dying at Average Age of 37 says Report

“Indigenous people living in Toronto are dying much sooner than the city’s non-aboriginal population, according to a new health report.

…the average age of death for indigenous people is 37 years old as compared to 75 years old for non-aboriginal residents. The numbers are based on people who used the AHT clinic and three other facilities in the city.

Twenty-two of the deaths were babies or children who died before the age of 11, Metro News reported.”