Category Archives: Nature and Science

Winter morning in the forest…

On my morning walk along Hoy Creek Trail, after checking on the salmon at Hoy Creek Hatchery this morning I was blessed to witness this sight.  I just love light coming through the trees. It’s magical…

This very old stump above is a favourite spot for photos any time of year and children can even climb within this stump.

I love the colourful contrast of white snow on this bright green moss.

snow-on-moss-tree

The forest was alive with the sounds of chickadees, and I was pleased to capture this little black-capped chickadee hopping along a moss-covered tree branch chirping and nibbling.

 

Am I Anti-Pipeline?

It gets frustrating when I hear people make statements about others being ‘pro-pipeline’ or ‘anti-pipeline’, as it’s not that cut and dry.  Many that argue for the expansion of pipelines often justify themselves by asking if you enjoy your heated home or your car, or they ask if you use plastic.

Of course we have benefited from pipelines and have lived and progressed in many ways with the heavy use of fossil fuels.  My father helped put in roads and pipelines in the north of Canada. The oil industry provides an income to my nephew and many of my childhood friend’s families, as I grew up in Alberta.

Pipelines are not going away overnight, and every so-called ‘anti-pipeline person’ knows that. However we have to start making a change, and like any other revolution through time, the change will come, one step at a time. Personal choices are key. How we live, what we purchase, what we eat, all affect the whole. We must stop new pipelines to come into balance and make that turn for a greener tomorrow – to begin the reversal from what has wrecked havoc on our environment.

Sure we’ve seemingly benefited by the use of fossil fuel, but it was at a cost to our environment. Today more and more are divesting and directing their money away from fossil fuels. My brother’s company is pioneering in this movement.

Pipeline in the 1950s, Manitoba, Canada (Photo from the Whachell family album)
Pipeline in the 1950s, Manitoba, Canada (Photo from the Whachell family album)

We have the know-how to go-green through alternate means, and keep fossil fuels in the ground. However we are creatures of habit,  who like to cling to the old ways, and ridicule those who take a stand toward change. We are being egged on to remain complacent by those attempting to debunk new ideas, as a financial loss is at stake (for some). In a world where social media has us inhaling ideas like breathing air, we must be mindful.

Here’s one case in point: The Wall Street Journal, known to be a highly respected publication has a recent article titled, “What the Dakota Access Pipeline Is Really About” where the writer, Kevin Cramer goes on to say that First Nations were consulted; that it’s not about protecting water; etc, etc.

Yet, look at what Wikipedia tells us about the ‘writer.’ I was shocked to find this: [Cramer has been described by Reuters as “one of America’s most ardent drilling advocates.”  Cramer supports an increase in oil and gas drilling on public lands and supports cutting taxes for energy producers. He is opposed to what he characterizes as overreach by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In May 2016, Donald Trump asked Cramer to draft his campaign’s energy policy.  He wrote Trump’s energy plan, which focuses heavily on promoting fossil fuels and weakening environmental regulation. The plan also vows to withdraw the U.S. from the Paris climate agreement and repeal U.S. regulations aims at controlling the carbon emissions which cause climate change. Cramer was “one of a handful of early Trump endorsers” among House Republicans.”]

Yet the Wall Street Journal just let’s Cramer have his way with us…

I encourage everyone to watch the free documentary  on National Geographic channel called Before the Flood by Leonardo DiCaprio. American actor DiCaprio admits in the film that he’s likely been one of the worst abusers of personal use of fossil fuels. Many will just stop right here, because I’ve even mentioned his name. That’s where we go wrong. We get so narrow-minded and hear one thing that is negative about someone (often from a ‘debunker’), and we check them off our credibility list.

First Nations people paddle in front of Kinder Morgan on Burrard Inlet during the Salish Sea Gathering in 2015. (Photo: Robbin Whachell)
First Nations people paddle in front of Kinder Morgan on Burrard Inlet during the Salish Sea Gathering in 2015 hosted by the Tsleil-Waututh Nation. Traditional unceded Coast Salish territory. (Photo: Robbin Whachell)

Another person I am tired of hearing be bashed is David Suzuki. Suzuki said, “By deciding in favour of the fossil fuel industry, the federal government is rejecting climate science and ignoring overwhelming community and First Nations opposition.” This man has given his life to educate us about the preciousness and intricacies of our planet, our bodies and our minds, yet people say he has a ‘hidden agenda’. Really? For what? If the man is exposing those that exploit our world’s greatest assets, don’t you think those that are gaining monetarily will attempt to make him look bad anyway they can, and at any cost?

What irks me most about pipelines like the Dakota Access, and Kinder Morgan is that the very few rich, get richer at the expense of the land, and the people that enjoy or live on that land, in particular the First Nations people. It only takes one (1) spill to ruin an environment, possibly forever.

I am opposed to Kinder Morgan for those same reasons, and because of the expected increase to tanker traffic in an area we hope our future generations can enjoy as much as we do.  I personally paddle in that inlet and see firsthand the marvels of nature on land, and in and on the ocean. I also work closely with my local wild salmon sustainability program, and I want my grandchildren to see these amazing fresh and ocean water fish return into our streams like we do today.

Grand Chief Stewart Phillip, President of the Union of British Columbia Indian Chiefs said in a recent letter to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, “You cannot truly believe that the Kinder Morgan sevenfold increase in tanker traffic is not a real risk to the B.C. coast, to everything that Coast Salish Peoples hold dear, including the fishing and tourism industries, to the orcas, shell-fish harvesting and the dynamic life systems in the ocean and on land…”

Burrard Inlet is enjoyed by the public. People kayak, canoe, row, and dragon boat along the waterway. This is my dragon boat team, the Nothin' Dragon Masters. (Photo: Erica McCarthur))
Burrard Inlet is enjoyed by the public. People kayak, canoe, row, and dragon boat along the waterway. This is my dragon boat team, the Nothin’ Dragon Masters. (Photo: Erica McCarthur))

It’s upsetting and just plain wrong that First Nations people of the affected areas are not being consulted in these big pipeline deals and are lied to by our government.

In the end, I have friends (and possibly family) that likely think I am naive and uneducated. Perhaps they are right.  I am no economist, scientist or marine biologist, and I don’t like labels. I know I lean more toward humanism and naturalism, “Pro-People” or “Pro-Planet.”

I am not simply, ‘anti-pipeline’ because it’s more than just about pipelines and profits, it’s about people and our planet.

[Focused Fashion: In this photo I am wearing my new Green Embassy sleeveless Organic Alpaca felted jacket made in Australia! This jacket is part of the “Empty Oceans Series” and 1/3 of its purchase goes towards Sea Shepherd Australia. Please support efforts to keep our oceans safe for seals, whales and dolphins.

About Robbin Whachell…

My Allergies are in Bloom!

 

I am about as granola bar as it gets when it comes to health. I was raised on lots of vegetables, vitamins, chiropractic,  and rarely went to a doctor growing up.

When I moved back to Canada from The Bahamas, I had no idea that I’d be suffering with seasonal or spring allergies.   I was fine for the first few years as I was living in a high rise.  Then, when I moved into a house, it happened to be March and I was hit by the running nose, sneezing, swollen head and itchy  eyes. I was miserable!

I researched and tried anything alternative at first, but when I couldn’t take the pain  I went to the drugstore.  However, even taking an allergy relief tablet daily was not helping me much.   My eyes were even streaming as I slept, and I’d wake up to crusty irritable eyes. It felt like I had a bad case of the flu.

It wasn’t until the middle of my attendance at  Vancouver Fashion Week that I realized I could not take it any longer, and I went into a walk in clinic on a Saturday morning to seek help.

The Trinity for Allergies
The Trinity: Ran-Montelukast, Pataday, and Omnaris

Dr. Milne in Coquitlam came to my rescue. He told me I needed three things to get my hay fever or spring allergies down, and get them down good.  I’ve since called his prescription, “The Trinity.”   Orally I take one Ran-Montelukast; then for my eyes, one drop of Pataday; and for my nasal passage, a shot in each nostril of Omnaris.

Although the bill is around $150 for a month’s supply, I’d pay twice that, or more, to be out of the misery.   Within two days of starting on the regime (dosages are once per day) I was feeling normal again. And, it does not even make me drowsy.

The following year when I felt it coming on, I wasted little time to get my fix.  This year, I felt like I was almost going to get through it, then boom… (6 days later than last year’s date), I could not take the growing symptoms,  and went in for the Trinity.  Interestingly, the clinic receptionist was red-eyed and stuffy when I got there. You could tell she was suffering from allergies. I am not sure why she’d not talk to the doctors she works for, but I shared my story with her.

I can’t imagine how many people live with this every year, when they don’t have to.  I am certainly grateful for modern science on this one, as I am usually out-of-doors, paddling, hiking, or doing watershed and salmon related work.  Canada’s west coast is one of the most beautiful places to be in the spring, and I am glad I can get out and enjoy it!

Crocuses-Whachell-Robbin
First signs of spring – beautiful crocuses (Photo: Robbin Whachell)

Spending Time in Nature – My Daily Om

Because we instinctively know that nature is good for us on many levels, it’s not unusual to feel powerfully drawn to it.

I can truthfully say that nature has provided me comfort, more than anything these last few years. My work at the creek or walks in the forest, or hikes up the mountain provide much needed breaks in my maddening days of internet, typing, writing, and the busyness of my life as a mother of four, and now the caretaker of  a senior parent…

This message from DailyOm.com today was spot on, and so I wanted to share it here, along with a photo and video I took. The following is written by Madyson Taylor:

In this modern age, we spend so much time indoors, focused on the busyness of our lives and disconnected from the earth. But much of what we truly need can only be found under the naked sky, alongside tall trees, on open plains, or in the sound of running water. Spending time in nature allows us to commune with other living beings and to find comfort in the nurturing embrace of Mother Earth. You can’t help but experience a different sense of self while walking in a wood or traversing a mountainside. Being in nature connects us to the earth, grounding us as we walk, unhindered by concrete, upon her. Surrounded by other living beings, both bigger and smaller than we are, we remember that human beings are simply one form of life in this vast universe.

Fall trees at Town Center Park, Coquitlam, BC, Canada (Photo: Robbin Whachell)
Fall trees at Town Center Park, Coquitlam, BC, Canada (Photo: Robbin Whachell)

Because we instinctively know that nature is good for us on many levels, it’s not unusual to feel powerfully drawn to it. Even if you live in a city or find it difficult to travel to a forest or the countryside, there are a myriad ways to reconnect with nature. When you step out of your door each morning, pause for a minute and close your eyes long enough to let your senses absorb your surroundings. Listen and breathe deeply, until you hear the wind rustling through branches, smell rain on damp grass, and see the reflection of leaves brushing up against windowpanes. If you have time, crouch down and closely examine any nearby grass and soil. The sights, sounds, smells, and sensations we experience that are part of nature can remind us of all the gifts Mother Earth grants us each day.

“Spending time connecting with nature nourishes the soul, reminds you that you are never truly alone, and renews you by attuning you to the earth’s natural rhythms. Taking a walk under the stars or feeling the wind on your face may be all it takes for you to reconnect with nature. Remember, you are as much a part of nature as are the leaves on a tree or water bubbling in a brook.” – Daily Om

The changing seasons... Blackberry leaves turn yellow (Photo: Robbin Whachell)
The changing seasons… Blackberry leaves turn yellow (Photo: Robbin Whachell)

The BC Windstorm of August 2015

 

It came out of nowhere and only lasted a few hours, and then we saw the devastation…

On Saturday, August 29th I was recovering from a very late night with little sleep as I allowed my 21 year old son to have a party post-birthday since it landed in the middle of the week this year.

He was on the phone and I was noticing the eddies of leaves along our street, and heard the wind come up through the trees.  He went to head up the hill here in Coquitlam to stop in at his girlfriend’s. He’d only been gone a few minutes when he called me all upset. My mind raced to my worst fear that perhaps he’d totaled the car, but then he told me he’d been narrowly missed by huge falling trees on Pinewood Drive, just below our fire station which closed that street.

BC Hydro deemed it one of the worst natural disasters its seen in 10 years.  710,000 of its 1.4 million BC Hydro customers on Vancouver Island and the Lower Mainland lost power. It’s been deemed the single largest outage in the company’s history. Hundreds of street intersection lights were knocked out, causing huge traffic delays throughout the lower mainland.  Winds were up to 90km/ hour at its peak.

After my son had called me, I put on a jacket and headed out to see this windfall he mentioned for myself. I cut through a small portion of Hoy Trail on my way, and soon regretted that move. Sounds, which I first thought were lightning strikes, were actually trees cracking and my short 50 yard walk through the trail turned into a sprint for me as limbs snapped from branches and dropped around me.

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These trees may look small but the two on the ground were taller than I and I had to climb over them to get home.

I later walked along the full loop of Hoy Trail behind Douglas College and in two spots the trail was impassible as beautiful very old trees had come down. I had to climb up over them to get home.

Our power remained out for over 48 hours (some suffered through 72), and it was crazy to find out the large area of the lower mainland of Vancouver that was affected, out to White Rock and Abbottsford.  Apparently the winds came up from the south, which was rare, and we’ve had such a dry, hot summer, and the trees were in full heavy leaves that it cause for more to be uprooted.

What I found most interesting, when I review my photos now, is that many of the trees actually snapped in half or higher up, and were not uprooted.

I took this photo 4 days after the storm... trees just snapped like match sticks.
I took this photo 4 days after the storm… trees just snapped like match sticks.

The power outage was a pain, but my family is used to the hurricanes of The Bahamas so this hardship was light in comparison. We had running water, our barbecue, and Coleman stove, and electricity was spotty throughout Coquitlam, so could run out to charge phones, etc.

Mother Nature remains a force to be reckoned with and makes us ‘humble’ humans at her call…

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Coquitlam firefighters talk to residents of a condominium on Lasalle Place which had a huge tree fall onto and through the roof. The roped off area is the top of that tree, the trunk is at the back end of the condo.

See more of my photos in my Facebook album.

Summer Wanes…

 

A sign of things to come…

I love living in British Columbia, and I love living so close to nature.

I go for walks most days, often twice and living next to a forest, it’s easy to be in tune with the changing seasons.

Walking with my mother in the woods the other day we were discussing how you can walk down a trail one way and when you walk back it looks entirely different.  Not just the trail itself, but everything you see along the way. Add to that the lighting, dependent on the time of day, the weather and the seasons.

I am so much into nature these days  that I revel in every little change, excited like a young child.

I had to stop to capture this photo of three  leaves changing colour. The center leaf is almost entirely  red, and the ones on either side of it are wonderfully on their way, and only half red; looking almost as if someone painted them down one side only.

“As the bright green fades away, we begin to see yellow (red) and orange colors. Small amounts of these colors have been in the leaves all along. We just can’t see them in the summer, because they are covered up by the green chlorophyll.”  – sciencemadesimple.com

Although spring is my favourite time of year, fall is definitely a close second. I am looking forward to autumn’s magnificence!

 

Robbin Whachell lives in Coquitlam, BC and is a volunteer for the local watershed society. In her spare time she likes to hike The Crunch and  explore her community by taking photos and sharing her thoughts on what she sees.

Join me in releasing coho smolts into Hoy Creek

I am really excited about Sunday, May 3rd as it marks 1 year that I have been volunteering with the Hoy-Scott Watershed Society in the city of Coquitlam where I live.

One year ago I saw a notice on Facebook and walked to the creek system just across from the house I am renting. It was pouring rain but it was worth the walk, and made for a wonderful experience, as I got to witness delighted young children carrying buckets of coho salmon smolts over a short distance from a pond to be released in  Hoy Creek.  I even transferred a few over myself.

I had lots of questions for the volunteers, and after one of them answered me, I was asked if I would be interested in volunteering. That’s all it took, and looking back now, a lot has happened in one year. My work at the salmon hatchery and in the watershed has been one of my most enriching experiences.

Not only does it get me away from this machine where I put in so many long days for my career, but I get to enjoy the forest, work amid flora and fauna, and dabble in the science of taking care of salmon from egg to the smolt stage.

Thursday is now my day to take care of the salmon feeding and stats,  so if you are ever around the hatchery mid-morning, come by and say hi.

The Salmon Leave Home event will run rain or shine, and begins at 11am running until 2pm.  Once the smolts are into the creek they head downstream, where Hoy Creek joins Scott Creek, and then it’s out to the ocean.  What’s even more amazing is that these salmon will travel back to the very same creek they were born in to spawn in the years to come.  Nature is so amazing!

I will be writing a more in depth feature called Salmon Story, coming soon.

The Hoy Creek Hatchery is located on Hoy Creek Trail, west of the City Centre Aquatic Complex at the corner of Pinetree and Guildford Way. Aerial view.

Hoy Trail has a several entrances:
– Walk in from Princess Crescent;
– Walk in from behind Douglas College;
– Walk in from Guildford Way (between Johnson and Pinetree);
– Walk in from Walton Avenue, or behind Walton Elementary;
– Walk in from the foot of Lasalle Place.
OR go to Google maps and type in “Hoy Creek Hatchery”.

Scott Creek gets an invasive English ivy removal for Earth Day

As members of Hoy / Scott Creek Watershed Society (HSWS), this past Sunday in Coquitlam, my daughter Jackie and I joined the congregation of Eagle Ridge United Church (ERUC)  in honour of International Earth Day 2015.  After feeding the salmon at Hoy Creek Hatchery  I put on a #BadSeed t-shirt (it was getting hot out) and we headed down with other HSWS members to help  remove invasive plants (mainly English Ivy) and garbage from the banks of Scott Creek south of Guildford Way and Eagleridge Drive.

I was shocked when we arrived and the congregation had already nearly a dump truck full of ivy. We jumped in and continued  on with them.  It’s always heartwarming to see families out, and people of all ages working together in nature with a common goal. The City of Coquitlam had provided the truck and all the equipment for clipping, digging, and garbage picking.

I’ve always loved English Ivy, and remember having it in our home in Alberta growing up. It was almost treated like an exotic plant there, as well as in The Bahamas, were I used to live. It’s everywhere here in British Columbia, and it looks so pretty growing over everything. Even though it’s beautiful,  it’s fast growth and extensive rooting system can quickly take over an entire area. Pulling  up ivy was not as easy I thought, as you could start by pulling up a root at your feet, and find out it extends meters away. My back sure felt it the  next day!

In total over 50 people come out, thanks to Eagle Ridge United. The photo above, provided by ERUC, is only a portion of those who lent a hand. “Improving the quality of this valuable habitat by removing invasive plants and garbage, and helping to restore native vegetation, is one small way our congregation is giving back to our neighbourhood” says Ingrid Brown, Associate Pastor for ERUC.

Jackie standing by a pile of uprooted English ivy; Ivy on the trees; Me next to the Bad Seed sign (no it's not a rock band, lol; and Jackie planting a tree that will support the riparian area were also planted.
Jackie standing by a pile of uprooted English ivy; Ivy on the trees; Me next to the Bad Seed sign (no it’s not a rock band, lol); and Jackie planting a tree that will support the riparian area.

Once we were done, my daughter reminded me that I’d promised her Starbucks, and we walked the short block to get something cold. Guess what they had in their patio planters?  Yup, English ivy!

Established in the Hoy-Scott watershed in 1987, Eagle Ridge United Church is located squarely between Hoy and Scott Creeks, which join together before entering into the Coquitlam River. Both creeks support numerous species of salmon, including chum, coho, pink and steelhead, and provide habitat for a diversity of wildlife in this urbanized neighbourhood.

The Hoy / Scott Watershed Society operates a small salmon hatchery in Coquitlam and conducts a salmon enhancement program. The group stewards the Hoy and Scott Watersheds, promotes public awareness and education, and is involved in watershed restoration and preservation.

English ivy is used throughout the Lower Mainland Vancouver area in landscaping. I took this photo in a shopping center parking lot in Coquitlam.
English ivy is used throughout the Lower Mainland of Vancouver used mainly in landscaping. I took this photo in a shopping center parking lot in Coquitlam.

Coquitlam groups to clean a portion of Scott Creek for Earth Day

Photo of Scott Creek looking south toward Guildford Way in Coquitlam  (Photo: Robbin Whachell)
Photo of Scott Creek looking south toward Guildford Way in Coquitlam (Photo: Robbin Whachell)

I am always pleased to be assisting with Hoy Scott Watershed Society, and although the hatchery is located on Hoy Creek, just a short walk from my home, it’s great to be focusing some attention on Earth Day over at Scott Creek. We will not be in the creek but in the riparian area along it.

Here’s our press release:

Coquitlam, BC – The congregation of Eagle Ridge United Church (ERUC) is giving back to its neighbourhood in honour of International Earth Day 2015. On April 19 from 1:00pm to 3:00 pm ERUC will be joining with the Hoy/Scott Watershed Society to remove invasive plants and garbage from the banks of Scott Creek between Guildford Way and Eagleridge Drive.

“The Hoy/Scott Watershed Society has been working to remove invasive plants around the hatchery on Hoy Creek and is looking forward to expanding our work to the Scott Creek corridor in partnership with Eagle Ridge United Church” says president Lindsay Pollock.

Established in the Hoy-Scott watershed in 1987, Eagle Ridge United Church is located squarely between Hoy and Scott Creeks, which join together before entering into the Coquitlam River. Both creeks support numerous species of salmon, including chum, coho, pink and steelhead, and provide habitat for a diversity of wildlife in this urbanized neighbourhood.

“Improving the quality of this valuable habitat by removing invasive plants and garbage, and helping to restore native vegetation, is one small way our congregation is giving back to our neighbourhood” says Ingrid Brown, Associate Pastor for ERUC.

ERUC is located at 2813 Glen Drive in Coquitlam. Everyone is invited to worship on Sundays at 10 am, and participate in community events such as this Earth Day good neighbour initiative. For more information, visit www.eruc.ca or call 604-945-9811.

The Hoy / Scott Watershed Society operates a small salmon hatchery in Coquitlam and conducts a salmon enhancement program. The group stewards the Hoy and Scott Watersheds, promotes public awareness and education, and is involved in watershed restoration and preservation. Learn more at hsws.ca.

Psychology and the Doggy-Doo Bag

I recall the old days when you would be out walking and you would have to dodge the little piles of dog poo here and there along lawn-edged sidewalks or during a stroll in the park. “Watch out for dog doo!”  was the refrain when mom would take us to the park, and if you did get it on your shoe, it was a mammoth task to get that smell off.  I have memories of running barefoot through our lawn in Alberta as a child, enjoying the fresh coolness of the dewy grass – that is until I stepped into a fresh pile of our dog’s doo!

Life’s changed a lot since then, and society and pet owner’s have had to adapt to city bylaws that have most definitely made modern times a little less unsightly… or so we’d hope.  To get us trained like ‘good little humans,’ they started us off with free bag dispensers in all the park areas in most cities in Canada.  We now have the handy-dandy doggy-doo bags that are in a convenient roll and even come in pretty colours and designs. Tie a roll to your dog leash and you are never left in the lurch when you take anxious Fido out for a quick walk. I hope at least that they have passed laws to ensure those little pretty baggies are indeed biodegradable? The amount of disposable diapers filling our earth is bad enough.

Garbage cans for waste are more prevalent than the old days, but there never seems to be enough trash cans around when you need them most.  I hold my breath while passing doggy dumpsters – those metal bins that seem to be airtight  (like that makes sense?) the smell is unbearable.  Please give those garbage people a raise! Did they not think that it might be better to have air holes in them so they don’t start brewing?

Being  a nature lover I get outside as much as possible.  The most disheartening thing I see on walks, is not the inevitable bits of trash here and there, it’s the randomly discarded doggy-doo bag.

But just wait a minute!?  People take time to go out and buy the baggies; then they take the time to scoop up their dog’s doo (thin plastic between flesh and fresh warm poo); they take the time to tie the little knot at the top; and then they illegally drop them along places that are close to where they walk.

I see doggy bags everywhere! Watch out, I may just send out the Doggy-doo police...
I see doggy bags everywhere! Watch out, I may just send out the Doggy-doo police…

I can’t understand the logic and I’ve been pondering this for months now, trying to think through all sorts of scenarios as to the ‘why,’  Like maybe, just maybe, their doggy bag was just freaking them out one day and felt too hot to handle, or the colour did not match their track suit and matching runners (note to self… get the ‘neon pink’ baggies next time I hit the store). Or they had no idea when the next trash can was coming up on the path or trail, and ‘I’ll be d*mned if I am going to walk any further with this in my hand!’

Added to this ‘crime’ there are many ‘types of tosses’ I have noticed.  There is the just drop it where you are dumps; the fling its – “how about into those bushes over there, so no one sees it”  not thinking about the other three seasons when the leaves are thinner or down!). Lastly there’s the good ole’ fling-it up high into those woods over there dumps (Oops darn, it got caught on a branch) — another new anomaly when the leaves drop.

Wouldn’t it have been better in all these cases just to let nature take it’s course, and led the unsightly simply dry out into dust!?

Finally  I figured it the psychosis of it!  I think people who take time to buy and use the doggy-doo bag really don’t like to see a mess, or be associated to one. They take the time do do what’s right and purchase and pick up the poo.  They don’t like the poo so much, that when they are out walking, and know they still have a ways to go, they begin to not like the idea that they are holding on to the poo; and they feel uncomfortable being SEEN with the poo in the colourful bag (now a beacon) in their hand, and heaven-forbid should someone they know pass them and see them holding poo!

Relieving such stress has only one remedy, and it’s the quick flick of the wrist.  Done, gone, did NOT happen!

So how do we solve such a situation with these new types of litterers? Do we create doggy-doo police?  We need a solution, something that resolves being SEEN with a doggy-doo bag in our hand. It could just be the next money maker in the pet industry.

Then I got it! I will invent  a new carrying container so you won’t be seen with the baggy. No one can know what it is, so it will look like a water bottle (yes!), and of course it will come in all colours (neon too), but it can’t be clear, or black (think hot summer).  You can carry it along like you would your water, and it will hold your doggy-doo bag/s inconspicuously inside, so no one will have to know you are carrying your dog’s s#&!

Until then watch out for the Doggy-doo Police! They are disguized and normal humans, out enjoying their day!

(The video below I shot while out on a run in my neighbourhood. I call this felony the ‘Daily dump’)

 

Robbin Whachell lives in Coquitlam, BC and is a volunteer for the local watershed society. In her spare time she likes to hike The Crunch and  explore her community by taking photos and sharing her thoughts on what she sees.